David Pogorelc

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David Pogorelc

David Pogorelc

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David Pogorelc

 

Davd Pogorelc at work to help promote America and the American Dream

David Pogorelc has been in real estate for over 30 years. During this time he’s experienced the extreme undulations that best describe the Boston real estate market over the past three decades.

Before founding Core Investments, David was a founder and partner at Helm Investments, a real estate investment firm focusing on residential Boston properties. Prior to co-founding Helm, he was investing in undervalued real estate and enhancing and creating value through a variety of development projects. Over the past two decades, David has developed a significant contact base in the Boston market that has contributed to the success of Core and its partnerships.

Today in South Boston David is involved in transforming industrial parcels into an vibrant neighborhoods, office and retail space.  In 2015 plans were filed with the Cit yof Boston.  Some of the major facets of the space include:

  • A “transformative phased development” comprising eight new buildings across six blocks at the intersection of Dorchester Street and Old Colony Avenue
  • 658,000 square feet of residential space
  • 77,000 square feet of ground-floor commercial uses, including a grocery store, neighborhood retail, full-service restaurants with outdoor seating
  • 1.4 acres of public open space

In August 2016 the plans were formally approved by the City.  The Washington Village project will be one of a dozen highly tranformative developments in Boston.

David graduated from Bryant University with a B.A. in Marketing and minor in Economics.

In August 2013 the Whitehouse ran a campaign that outlined now former President Obama’s plan of regular Americans realizing the dream of home ownership.  In the post here http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/08/06/promoting-american-dream-homeownership
the Whitehouse said “For years, owning a home was a symbol of responsibility and a source of security for millions of middle-class families across the country. But the financial crisis in 2008 put that all at risk, and by the time President Obama took office, the housing market was in free fall. Home values were plummeting and foreclosures were at record highs.”

David Pogorelc wholeheartedly agrees.  “I hope President Trump will continue this by promoting good programs that make it affordable and cost-effective for more Americans to own their homes,” he says.  “Together we can make American dream great again.”

 

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The following article appeared in The Boston Globe on May 4, 2017

Homes for the middle class — in Southie (!)

Developer Dave Pogorelc sets his sights on transforming the area around Andrew Square.

Written by Tim Logan

For all the transformation that has come to South Boston over the last decade or so, the industrial streets around Andrew Square have stayed largely the same. That is about to change.

Developer Dave Pogorelc will break ground this fall on Washington Village, a nine-building, 656-unit pile of condos, apartments, and retail replacing 5 acres of old auto shops and commercial laundries between Old Colony and Dorchester avenues. It will be the biggest residential development to hit South Boston in the current boom — indeed, one of the largest residential projects in the entire city. And it’s aimed squarely at a slice of the market for which developers in Boston have struggled to build: the middle class.

Pogorelc picked up a big chunk of the site in foreclosure seven years ago, which helped to keep land costs down. He’s hoping the scale of his project will spread costs enough to keep units relatively affordable. And on top of the city’s usual 13 percent affordable-housing requirement, he’s setting aside 26 units at prices accessible to middle-income households.

Once Washington Village gets rolling, Pogorelc and his investors may turn to two more big chunks they own along Dorchester Avenue north of Andrew Square, land the city just rezoned to allow more tall and dense housing. That means he’ll likely be changing the neighborhood for a long time to come.

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